Coronavirus Resources

Page updated 4/1/2020

Contents

Introduction to the Issue

Library Closures

Resources Specifically for Libraries

Legal, Financial, & Library Board Governance Resources

Sample Approaches from Public Libraries

Illinois State Resources

CDC Resources

World Health Organization Resources

Employment-Related Resources


Introduction

Information about the coronavirus, or COVID-19, is being continually developed, updated, and shared. Libraries and library staff are urged to consult authoritative sources such as the CDC, the WHO, and the Illinois Department of Public Health. A great deal of information from these outlets is being shared by ILA, ALA, ISL, and others, and noted below. 

As public spaces, libraries face a particular challenge when dealing with a public health challenge. ILA will keep this page updated and share news in the ILA Alert electronic newsletter. If you have a resource to suggest, or a question that you do not see answered, please email ILA Executive Director Diane Foote. Please note: We may not always have an answer, because this is a developing situation and everything about the novel coronavirus is not yet known, but we will do our best to find out.

FAQ: Libraries and the Coronavirus


Library Closures

3/23/2020 update: On Friday, March 20, 2020, Governor Pritzker issued Executive Order 2020-10 declaring "Stay at Home" status for the entire state. This Executive Order supersedes the 3/16/2020 ILA Statement on Library Closures. Please see "Legal, Financial, and Library Board Governance Resources," below, for complete details. 

3/16/2020 ILA Statement on Library Closures 

In light of Governor Pritzker's recent closing of Illinois public schools, restaurants, and bars, his disaster proclamation, and recommendation to avoid  large gatherings, as well as the news that cases of COVID-19 are appearing in more areas of the state, the Illinois Library Association recommends that public libraries, and academic libraries on campuses that have otherwise closed, in Illinois suspend public operations, including closing for a period of time. 

While normally public libraries may invite children to come to the library in the event of an emergency school closing, this is not the best course of action when trying to curb a contagious disease. Because containment works best when all organizations participate, many libraries and other cultural organizations are deciding to close while the schools are closed. 

Libraries are a gathering place in the community and on campus, frequently bringing together significant numbers of people. In order to minimize opportunities for transmission, and to protect both community members' health and library employees, the best service we can offer is protecting our community with social distancing, canceling programs, extra cleanings, and closing, regardless of whether there are  known cases in your library's service area or on your campus.

Ultimately, barring a government mandate, the decision to close must be made at the local level; ILA also recommends that every library monitor the guidance issued from the Illinois Department of Public Health.


Resources Specifically for Libraries

Legal, Financial, and Library Board Governance Resources

  • 4/1/2020 update: Public libraries and public library districts ARE eligible to apply for Public Assistance (PA) FEMA funds via the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA). Special non-profit libraries are also likely to be eligible to apply. School and academic libraries should seek guidance from their administrative authority about possible application/applicability, as their parent organization might already be seeking funding. Key points: 1) There is a minimum of $3,300 in "eligible extraordinary uninsured costs" (defined under "Category B – Emergency Protective Measure Costs" on the document below) that include, but are not limited to, such things as "disinfection of eligible public facilities" and "state, tribe, territory and/or local government force account overtime costs" due to the COVID-19 pandemic; 2) There is a cost share (25% applicant, 75% federal funds); and 3) The current application deadline is April 12, 2020. A good place to start is IEMA's Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic: Eligible Emergency Protective Measures Fact Sheet. This is an admittedly complex opportunity but one that may be worth exploring: Everyone is encouraged to go over it with your library's legal counsel and/or finance staff. Comprehensive information provided to ISL and ILA by IEMA on 3/31/2020 includes steps applicants should take, a great many links, definitions, and resources, and contact information for further questions and guidance. The process is somewhat involved, but following the bulleted items in the document from IEMA is the best way to get started.
  • 3/29/2020 update: On March 27, 2020, H.R. 748, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act became law. The CARES Act includes $50 million to be distributed to states via IMLS and we will need to await guidance from IMLS on the process for awarding, although we expect the mechanics to work via the existing Grants to States program. ALA has summarized resources in the Act that are directly related to libraries.
  • 3/29/2020 update: On March 26, 2020, Governor Pritzker issued Executive Order 2020-14, which grants a notary temporary authority to perform remote notarizations within the state of Illinois. This authority is terminated when the Gubernatorial Disaster Proclamation, issued on March 9, 2020, is rescinded or expires. This is important for libraries to know for two reasons: 1) many libraries do offer notary services; and 2) in case in case a notary were to be required, per local library or municipal rules, to attest to board action or other activities taken by the public body.
  • 3/29/2020 update: "Summary of Core Points of the U.S. Department of Labor's Guidance on Paid Leave Under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and the Emergency Family & Medical Leave Expansion Act," prepared by the Law Offices of Dalal M. Jarad, Schaumburg. This guidance is largely consistent with the information previously provided in the 3/22/2020 update (one exception: The "Guidance" now notes an effective date of April 1 rather than April 2), but may include additional insight and guidance. Library directors are urged to go over this material with your own HR and/or legal counsel to ensure understanding and compliance. 3/22/2020 update: On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law a new Act, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. The purpose of the Act is to serve as a response to the evolving COVID-19 Pandemic, and it specifically includes provisions that provide paid sick leave for eligible employees, as well as free coronavirus testing, expanded food assistance and unemployment benefits and requires employers to provide additional protections for health care workers. The Law Offices of Dalal M. Jarad, Schaumburg, has prepared a "Summary of Core Points of the Emergency Family & Medical Leave Expansion Act & the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act," both components of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. HR Source has also provided a helpful Q&A, "The Families First Coronavirus Response Act: Your Questions Answered," and Ancel, Glink's labor & employment law blog "The Workplace Report with Ancel Glink" addresses the issue.
  • 3/29/2020 update: IHLS has provided guidance from library attorney Phil Lenzini dated 3/26/2020 regarding compliance with the "Stay at Home" order. 3/23/2020 update: On March 20, 2020, Governor Pritzker issued Executive Order 2020-10 declaring "Stay at Home" status for the entire state. Here are FAQs provided by the state; we are also pleased to share HR Source's "Illinois Executive Order: Stay-at-Home" and Ancel, Glink's Municipal Minute blog post on the topic. Much of the information in these sources is duplicative and consistent; we include them all here for the sake of comprehensiveness.
  • 3/18/2020 update: The Illinois Attorney General has posted "Guidance to Public Bodies on the Open Meetings Act and the Freedom of Information Act during the COVID-19 Pandemic." The Law Offices of Dalal M. Jarad, Schaumburg, has prepared a "Summary of Core Points in Executive Order 2020-07 and the Illinois Attorney General's Guidance to Public Bodies. Municipal Minute, authored by Ancel, Glink, also addresses the issue.
  • 3/17/2020 update: Every public body must still post an agenda at least 48 hours in advance of holding any regular meeting electronically. Public notice of any special meeting that will be held electronically, except a meeting held in the event of a bona fide emergency, or of any rescheduled regular meeting, or of any reconvened meeting, likewise shall be given at 48 hours before such meeting, which notice shall also include an agenda for the special, rescheduled, or reconvened meeting. Public notice with agenda for any emergency meeting should be posted by the public body as soon as practicable. Public bodies are encouraged to provide video, audio, and/or telephonic access to such meetings to ensure members of the public can monitor the meeting, and to update their websites and social media to keep the public fully informed of changes to their meeting schedules or the format of their meetings due to COVID-19 (source: Law Offices of Dalal M. Jarad, Schaumburg).
  • On March 16, 2020, Governor Pritzker signed an executive order enabling boards of public bodies to meet electronically.

Sample Approaches from Public Libraries

  • Public Library Director Statement, from Seattle Public Library
  • Public Library Pandemic Response Procedures, from Vernon Area Public Library District Features guidance for several levels of public health challenge, including approaches for library staff, patrons, and the general public.
  • Coronavirus and your library, from Oak Park Public Library Information compiled for the use of library patrons includes information about COVID-19, travel, symptoms, prevention and treatment, guidance for households, and more information to assist communities.
  • 3/18/2020 update: Suggestions for facilities maintenance while buildings are closed, from the Bloomingdale Public Library: Flush all the toilets daily; if the seals dry up it can cause an expensive repair. Run hot water in a number of sinks for a few minutes; keeps your hot water heater from building up rust and potentially failing. Check on your ejector pits, you may need to manually run the pumps to empty them to the city sanitary system. Run your HVAC system to keep the air handlers moving the air; this will mix fresh outside air into your building while ejecting old inside air. If you have one, run the elevator a few times daily to keep the seals and valves full of hydraulic fluid. 

Illinois State Resources


CDC Resources


World Health Organization Resources


Employment Related Resources

iREAD Summer Reading Programs

Since 1981, iREAD provides high quality, low-cost resources and products that enable local library staff to motivate children, young adults, and adults to read.

Visit the iREAD website »

Latest Library JobLine Listings

Browse all JobLine listings »